Delhi

Delhi is bustling mega-metropolis of over 20 million residents is not only the capital of India but also one of the oldest city in India, here centuries of rule by numerous kings have created scores of sights for the curious traveler. The city clamors with chugging taxis, flurries of cars and throngs of busy residents, all flowing like water through the busy streets and alleyways. Here are Colorful markets come alive with exotic sights, sounds and aromas as vendors ply their wares for residents and visitors alike. With all there is to see, the ardent traveler will enjoy the rich and varied activities this ancient, yet also modern, hub of human civilization.

The Red Fort:

Crossing through the immense gates of this stately fortification, visitors immediately pass into a world of the 17th century where Mughal emperor Shah Jahan ruled this region of India with great influence. Roam the grounds of this royal complex and get a taste of the power of India’s historic past.

Jama Masjid:

As the largest and best-known mosque in the nation, this magnificent structure has an enormous courtyard of black and white marble that can accommodate as many as twenty-five thousand worshippers. Be sure to stop near the north gate where caretakers will display several relics including an antique copy of the Qur’an written on deerskin.

Qutab Minar:

Constructed with vertically fluted red sandstone and marble, it is the tallest minaret in India topping out at a height of 72 meters. Visitors may roam the grounds of this noted spire amid ornately carved sandstone buildings and lush gardens.

The Lotus Temple:

With the unique shape of a blossoming lotus flower rising gracefully from its garden surroundings, this modern-day temple welcomes guests of all faiths to worship freely amid others from around the world. Guests are invited to stroll the paths of the expansive grounds for peaceful reflection as well.

India Gate:

Inspired by the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, this prominent landmark was built in 1931 to commemorate the 90,000 soldiers of the Indian Army who lost their lives while fighting for the Indian Empire during World War I and the Third Anglo-Afghan War.

Humayun’s Tomb:

Commemorating the Mughal Emperor Humayun, this tomb from 1562 represented a leap in Indian architecture with its accomplished quadrilateral design, typical of Persian gardens, which set a precedent for subsequent Mughal structures and reached a stylistic apex with the grandeur of the TajMahal. Guests can marvel at the cavernous interior of this grand memorial, due to its use of a Persian double dome, the first such dome to be built in India.

error: Content is protected !!